Alternate Workshops: Finding an International Affiliation

Fulbright_logo

Monday, June 23, 5PM (Workshop)
109 Disque Hall (32nd and Chestnut)

 

In this workshop on how to find an international affiliation, you will be introduced to various online and University-resources that can help you connect with potential affiliations and learn strategies for initiating and negotiating that relationship.

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards funding for one academic year of self-designed study, academic research, creative projects, or teaching English in one of over 140 countries around the world. The program is sponsored by the Department of State.  Eligible students are US Citizens who will have a bachelor’s degree before the start of the grant (Fall 2015). Graduates and graduate students are also eligible to apply.

This is a repeating event. Make sure to visit our website for the full schedule.

Fulbright Friday: Statement of Grant Purpose (Rescheduled)

Fulbright_logoFriday, June 20, Friday, June 27, 12 – 2 pm
109 Disque Hall (32nd and Chestnut)

*PLEASE NOTE THE CHANGE OF DATE!* However, you can still come to work on your applications and ask questions on Fulbright Friday, June 20th, between 12-2pm.

The Statement of Grant Purpose is where you outline what you plan to do during your Fulbright year and why your project is a good fit with the country you are applying to. This workshop will help you understand what to address, how to get started, and equip you with strategies for revision.

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards funding for one academic year of self-designed study, academic research, creative projects, or teaching English in one of over 140 countries around the world. The program is sponsored by the Department of State.  Eligible students are US Citizens who will have a bachelor’s degree before the start of the grant (Fall 2015). Graduates and graduate students are also eligible to apply.

This is a repeating event. Make sure to visit our website for the full schedule.

Fellowships Graduation Awardee: Emily Buck

Emily Buck (Materials Science & Engineering, BS/MS ’14) has an outstanding track record of fellowships achievement:

She has been awarded the Goldwater Scholarship, the Whitaker Fellowship, the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, and is an Alternate for the Fulbright. Impressive.

But this is not why we chose to honor Emily with our Graduation Award.

Instead, we invite you to peek behind those impressive achievements:

  • Emily applied for Goldwater, which recognized the nation’s outstanding undergraduates in STEM fields; she didn’t get it, but she was named Honorable Mention. She applied again the following year and got it!
  • Emily applied for the Fulbright to support a post-graduation research project at a lab in Switzerland, and was named an Alternate. She also applied for the Whitaker Fellowship to support that same work and got it!
  • Emily applied for the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, which supports three years of research-based graduate study, and she got it the first time! But because the graduate program she will be attending at McGill University is out of the US, she has to decline.

Given her track record, we are absolutely certain that she will apply for, and likely get, alternative awards to support her PhD.

And so, we give this award to Emily for her persistence and her dedication to excellence; to her high bar, and her even higher standards for herself; for her facility with seeking support and for her willingness to lend that support to others. These are the traits of outstanding Honors students and the qualities that, combined with her creative and sharp intelligence, will ensure her success in Switzerland, in Canada, and throughout her career.

 

Going Abroad as a Foundation for the Future: Interview with Dr. Joel Oestreich

joel oestreichJoel Oestreich is Associate Professor in the Department of History and Politics, and the Director of International Area Studies. He has participated in fellowships committees organized by the DFO for the Fulbright US Student Program, the Carnegie Junior Fellows Program and the Boren Scholarship. 

How have your experiences abroad contributed to your personal and professional growth?

I’ve lived abroad a few times. I did my Master’s Degree in the UK and lived there for 2 years, then for almost a year in Bangladesh.  I did the Fulbright in India a year and a half ago and I’ve traveled pretty extensively beyond that as well. I run the International Area Studies program and trying to get every one of our students to go abroad has been a key part of our project.  There are some obvious advantages. You get to learn a foreign language, and if you already speak some, it’s the best way to become fluent.  You get to experience a different culture which is nice – whether that be Dhaka or Paris, you get to have adventures and do things that you otherwise couldn’t at home.  You also get a different perspective on the US from being with people who have different belief systems.

It might reinforce your belief that the US has got it right, or it might make you question things.  That’s a key part of the experience.

Another advantage is, I found a vocation in Bangladesh. At the time I was only interested in working in the US and Western Europe. I was living Dhaka almost on a whim and it changed what I thought was important in my life and what I thought I wanted to do with myself.  I’ve been working on economic development and human rights issues since but I never had any interest in those things before I went abroad. I had no idea what was out there.  And I’m not saying you necessarily have to find a humanitarian interest, you could very well end up in Europe doing international business.  The key is that it can really shape your perception of what’s important to yourself and open up different possibilities.

What is the advantage of being a Fulbright recipient?

It’s incredibly prestigious.  It looks great on your resume and graduate school application.  It’s an opportunity to live abroad and have someone pay for it, and a great opportunity to pursue what you’re passionate about while building a foundation for your future.  For instance, you can study agricultural techniques in another part of the world and if you want to go work in food security, that’s a great experience to have that otherwise would be very difficult to get. Also, you become part of a community of people.  There were dozens of Fulbrighters in India, so when I traveled around I always had people I could look up and stay with.

Why do think students might hesitate to apply?

I don’t want to speculate, but there is something about that way of thinking, “What do other countries have to teach us? We already have best this or that in Ann Arbor or Berkeley or whatever.” I travel a lot and I’m always meeting people – a lot of Europeans and Australians, but rarely Americans who are traveling for extended periods of time.  I remember talking to someone years ago about that.  There was a group of us, including this one American who asked, “Aren’t you afraid that you’ll be behind your peers when you get back?” That’s so American. This fear that you’ll be 25 with a 23-year-old’s job. Or parents being afraid that their kids will be robbed and murdered in a Third World country, which won’t happen. Or afraid that if they go to Europe, everybody hates America there! None of these things are true.

The idea that if you take two years off it will look bad to employers who will think you’ve been wasting your time while your friends buckled down – that’s not how the real world works at all. 

I’ve been in and out of the private sector for years and employers like having worldly, traveled people.  Going abroad makes a person more worldly and sophisticated, and in any business enterprise that’s an advantage.   This obsession with making every minute count towards one’s career is simply misplaced.  Travel is so much more important than that slight advantage of being at home slaving away for years – in fact your friends will be jealous of you. They’ll tell you, “Wow I should have done what you did.”

Fulbright Info Session

Fulbright_logoTuesday, June 10th, 9-10a.m.
Bossone 302 (Market between 31st and 32nd)

Come hear about the Fulbright US Student Program from Drexel students who are finalists for the program and staff from the Drexel Fellowships Office.

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards funding for one academic year of self-designed study, academic research, creative projects, or teaching English in one of over 140 countries around the world. The program is sponsored by the Department of State.  Eligible students are US Citizens who will have a bachelor’s degree before the start of the grant (Fall 2015). Graduates and graduate students are also eligible to apply.

This is a repeating event. Make sure to visit our website for the full schedule.

Fulbright Friday: Planning Session

Fulbright_logo June 6, 12 – 2 pm
Disque 109

The planning session is a space for you to explore your ideas, with the support of the Fellowships team, about where you want to go and what you’d like to do as a Fulbright Student Scholar. It’s ok to come without answers to these questions – the whole point is to try to flesh out what you are interested in, what you are actually equipped to do, your long-term goals and how the Fulbright might fit with those aspirations. The session will also give you a better sense of the scope of the application process and offer you guidance on how you can organize your time and build a supportive network around you.

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards funding for one academic year of self-designed study, academic research, creative projects, or teaching English in one of over 140 countries around the world. The program is sponsored by the Department of State.  Eligible students are US Citizens who will have a bachelor’s degree before the start of the grant (Fall 2015). Graduates and graduate students are also eligible to apply.

This is a repeating event. Make sure to visit our website for the full schedule.

Info Session: Fulbright English Teaching Assistant (ETA) Program

Fulbright_logoWednesday, June 4th, 12-1 p.m.
MacAlister 2019  (33rd and Chestnut)

Come hear about the Fulbright ETA Program from a Drexel alumna who’s teaching English in Brazil and staff from the Drexel Fellowships Office. As an ETA, you typically work alongside a teacher in an English classroom planning various activities to improve the students’ language abilities and knowledge of the United States. The Fulbright ETA is available in over 70 countries.

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards funding for one academic year of self-designed study, academic research, creative projects, or teaching English in one of over 140 countries around the world. The program is sponsored by the Department of State.  Eligible students are US Citizens who will have a bachelor’s degree before the start of the grant (Fall 2015). Graduates and graduate students are also eligible to apply.

This is a repeating event. Make sure to visit our website for the full schedule.

Today: Fulbright Friday

Fulbright_logo12-2pm
109 Disque Hall (32nd and Chestnut)
Pizza provided

If you’re thinking about or working on your Fulbright application, stop by between 12-2 today to ask questions, work in a space where you can really focus, get feedback, and get to know others who are going through a similar journey. Watch this video to get a sense of what it is like for students to work with the Fellowships Office:

 

 

 

Info Session: Fulbright English Teaching Assistant (ETA) Program

Fulbright_logoMonday, May 19th, 3-4 p.m.
Room Update: 109 Disque Hall (32nd and Chestnut)

Come hear about the Fulbright ETA Program from a Drexel alumna who’s teaching English in Brazil and staff from the Drexel Fellowships Office. As an ETA, you typically work alongside a teacher in an English classroom planning various activities to improve the students’ language abilities and knowledge of the United States. The Fulbright ETA is available in over 70 countries.

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards funding for one academic year of self-designed study, academic research, creative projects, or teaching English in one of over 140 countries around the world. The program is sponsored by the Department of State.  Eligible students are US Citizens who will have a bachelor’s degree before the start of the grant (Fall 2015). Graduates and graduate students are also eligible to apply.

This is a repeating event. Make sure to visit our website for the full schedule.

2014 Fulbright Update!

Seven Drexel students and alumni have been offered study/research grants by the prestigious Fulbright US Student Program this year.

Huge congratulations to Bradley Boehringer, Matt D’Arcy, Amanda Decker, Kerry Hamilton, Lauren Pitts, Adams Rackes and Hunter Snyder, as well as to Fulbright Alternate Emily Buck.

Bradley BoehringerBradley Boehringer (Nursing Education, MS ’14, Finland) is interested in evolving simulation technology that has rapidly become the norm in medical education. While he currently works in a Boston emergency department and for LifeFlight of Maine, Brad looks forward to partnering with Laurea University of Applied Sciences in Finland to establish and implement a mobile nursing simulation center for the country’s rural areas.

Matt D'ArcyMatt D’Arcy (Mechanical Engineering, BS’ 14, Honors, South Korea) will be joining the mission efforts of KAUSAT-5, a small satellite being designed and developed by the Space Systems Research Laboratory of Korea Aerospace University with the goal of mapping the Earth in the infrared spectrum. Matt studied abroad in Denmark during his junior year, where he got a taste for international experience, and was also involved in the early development of Drexel’s first satellite, DragonSat-1, launched in November of 2013 under the mentorship of Dr. Jin Kang.

Amanda DeckerAmanda Decker (Chemical Engineering, BS/MS ’14, Honors, Germany) will be working in conjunction with two departments at Ruhr University of Bochum (Oncology and Medical Engineering) to study sonoporation as a drug delivery system. She also looks forward to applying her chemical engineering plant skills through design work on microbubbles for large-scale pharmaceutical use. Amanda’s faculty mentor is Dr. Steven Wrenn.

Kerry HamiltonKerry Hamilton (Environmental Engineering, PhD ‘16, Australia) will be conducting a risk assessment of Brisbane’s roof-harvested rainwater in the laboratory of Dr. Simon Toze at Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). Kerry was an Association of Schools of Public Health fellow at the US Environmental Protection Agency and currently serves as president of Drexel Graduate Women in Science and Engineering (DGWISE), which organizes academic, community service, and networking events for the Drexel community. Her faculty mentor is Dr. Charles Haas.

Lauren PittsLauren Pitts (Couple and Family Therapy MS ’13, EdD ’17, Barbados) will be studying the impact of father-daughter communication on adolescent daughters’ sexual decision-making in Barbados. While earning her Master’s in Family Therapy at Drexel, Lauren was awarded the department’s Ivan Boszomenyi-Nagy Social Justice and Clinical Excellence Award, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services/ Health Resources and Services Administration scholarship.

Adams RackesAdams Rackes (Architectural Engineering, BS/PhD ’16, Honors, Brazil) will be collaborating with a leader in indoor air quality, Roberto Lamberts of Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, to develop a labeling system for naturally ventilated buildings His current research focuses on using machine learning and optimization techniques to improve the control of ventilation in commercial buildings in order to both save energy and improve indoor air quality. Adams also holds a BA in History and Literature from Harvard University. His faculty mentor is Dr. Michael S. Waring.

Hunter SnyderHunter Snyder (Film and Video Studies, BS ’12, Denmark/Greenland) will explore the relationship of Greenland’s Inuit with labor and land in light of the transformations caused by mining activity in the Arctic. In addition to the Fulbright, his recent awards include a National Geographic Young Explorer Award, a National Science Foundation EAGER Grant, an American-Scandinavian Foundation Fellowship, and a grant from the Arctic Institute of North America. He is currently taking graduate anthropology classes at the University of Oxford.

Emily BuckEmily Buck (Materials Science and Engineering, BS/MS ’14, Honors, Switzerland) hopes to conduct biomedical research at Switzerland’s École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, aimed at increasing the capacity of a specific protein to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue. Emily is a 2013-14 Goldwater Scholar, 2014-15 Whitaker Fellow and was awarded the 2014-17 NSF Graduate Research Fellow. In addition to research, she is very interested in encouraging women and minority students to pursue careers in STEM fields and hopes to continue her outreach activities throughout her graduate education.

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The Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards funding for one academic year of self-designed study, research, creative projects, or teaching English in one of over 140 countries around the world.

For more information please visit the Fulbright U.S. Student Program website or email fellowships@drexel.edu!

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